How DOOM’s Advertisements Made It One Of The Highest Selling Games Of 2016

I don’t play video games that often. I’m probably the only one at C3 Metrics that doesn’t make playing them a priority when I get home from work. That doesn’t mean I don’t appreciate them, though, that’s far from the truth. As a kid, I remember playing the original DOOM on my parents old 1998 Dell PC. The concept was always cool to me. A mixture of science-fiction, religious occult and fast paced, chainsaw wielding slaughter. You play as an unnamed space marine trying to stop the hordes of Hell from reaching Earth by any means necessary.

Well, when I first heard that they were doing a reboot of the franchise, I was skeptical. The last game, Doom 3, came out when I was in middle school and, at the time, it sold me. Although the pace of the game wasn’t something that resembled the original series, I still had fun but was let down due to it not quite feeling like Doom. Then the first trailer was released for the reboot and my inner 13-year old screamed in anticipation as I watched a live action trailer featuring the classic antagonist fighting hordes of demons and everything else.

The trailer starts out screaming. In as loud and as fast as it can, it quickly became apparent that this was going to be the same metal-infused slaughter-fest I had hoped for. The original character once again shows up, ripping through hordes of undead and Hell-spawn to put a stop to the invasion. My thought-process through the trailer was as follows:

“Dude, he just ripped off that demon-things jaw and threw it at another giant floating demon-thing while a raging fireball came flying at him!”

“HOLY SH** THATS A SCREAMING ROCKET SKELETON”

“A GIANT LUMBERING DEMON WITH A ROCKET LAUNCHER FOR A HAND WOW! ….AND THIS TINY GUY IS CHARGING RIGHT AT HIM?! – MADMAN!”

“YEAH YEAH! THRASH METAL DEMON KILLING!”

My love for the game I had enjoyed playing as a kid was rekindled in that two-minute and thirty-second video that I preordered it without even having a system to play it on.

What was so great was that even the trailers had tons of re-watch value. Currently, the trailer has over 8 million Youtube views, but the cinematic experience was something that was almost on par with the game itself. That’s an amazingly effective trailer in terms of content.

Check out the trailer here: